Tag Archives: badges

Is this Coursera Statement of Accomplishment Worth Anything?

I received my E-learning and Digital Cultures MOOC statement of accomplishment today. This has me thinking about assessment and certification.

The Voice Thread #EDCMOOC small group that I credit with helping me finish the course (see My Human Element) recently had a post-MOOC reflection synchronous conversation via a Google+ Hangout. One of the topics we discussed was assessment and certification, especially in an age of MOOCs and sites like Khan Academy. Felicia Sullivan brought up the idea of creating ways for certification to be separated from the course itself so that students/learners might be more inclined to focus on the learning. In other words, you could learn in various ways and then be assessed by some external body in order to show your mastery of a particular topic.

My MSLOC colleagues, Michelle Frisque and Teresa Torres, tweeted today about Mozilla’s Open Badges program which helped me further my thinking on this topic of certification. This is why I love Twitter!

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This type of badging program might offer a way for an individual to document his or her learning that happens outside of formal school settings. From their wiki:

Learning today happens everywhere, not just in the classroom. But it’s often difficult to get recognition for skills and achievements that happen outside of school. Mozilla’s Open Badges project is working to solve that problem, making it easy for anyone to issue, earn and display badges across the web — through a shared infrastructure that’s free and open to all. The result: helping people of all ages learn and display 21st century skills, unlock career and educational opportunities, and find new life pathways.

As Michelle Frisque mentioned, the City of Chicago is running Chicago Summer of Learning, a badging program using Mozilla’s open badge tool. The city is encouraging Chicago youth “…to engage in hands-on learning opportunities—particularly in science, technology, engineering, arts, and math”. I just signed up and am curious to see how my boys respond. I am starting to focus more and more on helping my boys engage in thoughtful ways with the technology that surrounds them as well as help them learn how to be intrinsically motivated life-long learners.

This Summer of Learning program seems like a great way to encourage the children of Chicago to keep on learning in a more free way over the summer! There are some compelling arguments for this type of system in this video by Mobile Digital Arts. It seems aligned with some of the ideas shared by Ali Carr-Chellman in her Ted talk called: Gaming to re-engage boys in learning.

So what is one to do with a Coursera statement of accomplishment? If you are curious what it looks like, mine is below. I’m not sure what I will do with this other than save it as a file on my computer. It certainly is not why I took the class. However, I do realize that there are particular contexts where this type of certificate might be important. There were some people who were expecting to get this statement almost immediately after the course finished and seemed upset that it was taking so long. I wonder how other EDCMOOC students are planning on using their statements of accomplishment? Maybe there will be a Cousera badge system via Mozilla soon – you can see a list of which organizations are currently issuing badges here: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges/Issuers.

EDCMOOC Statement of Accomplishment